My Love/Hate Relationship With Grocery Shopping

If there’s anything that moms love more than a complete lack of responsibilities in any given day, it’s the opportunity to escape the nest, fly solo, and hit up their favourite grocery store!

While I totally get that there are many, many other things that moms would prefer to do other than mentally calculate the family’s expenses, diet, and meals while navigating the endless aisles – think: spa day, wine & dine with friends, sip a hot coffee without a chorus of children babbles and destruction prevention – grocery shopping is the closest form of realistic escape that we can hope for.

I, like many other moms, love it when I can hop in the SUV, blast my own tunes, and take the five minute drive down the road to the local supermarket. If I’m feeling extra ambitious and free, I’ll go out of my way and skip provinces to my fave store, Farm Boy. Not only do I usually save a bit of money here, the store is so gorgeously designed that I feel like I’m in a trendy farmer’s market or in a completely new country! It’s just blissful.

However, this positive relationship I have with the places where the food lives is one that is quickly changing from Yeehaw! to blaw.

Like any new relationship, grocery shopping began with excitement, opportunity, and the donning of rose-coloured glasses. I believed it was what I wanted, what I needed.Β Looking back, it has become the relationship that I dread. The one I wish I could ghost away from.

As the girls get older, eat more, and become more demanding and picky with the grub they ingest, I find doing groceries to be more of a headache than the luxurious escape from the chaos it used to be.

Mostly, I’ve become extremely jaded by the prices of food. Like, I feel like an old man looking back at the days where a bag of flour cost a nickel and milk was delivered for 25 cents a week. I used to love filling the cart with items for the family, but now I’m cynical about the thrice a week chore.

Is it just me, or do food costs get jacked up every few weeks? It may be small, but it’s happening. I swear!

Aside from the rising price of food, the girls waste more than they ingest, which is a whole other issue. This means that every time I serve them a meal, I’m praying it all ends up in their face instead of on the floor, because every time I see the scrambled eggs splat or the cut up chicken wedged between the high chair and their butt cheeks, I’m mentally adding up how much they’ve wasted.

“Well, let’s see. Breakfast cost me $1.03, lunch was $0.94, and dinner…*sigh* there goes $3.12.” Adding all of this wasted food up at the end of the week fills me with despair.

The food items that really grinds my gearsΒ are dairy products – milk, cheese, butter, yogurt. These prices are outrageous! We go through these items SO FAST in our home, that this monthly budget alone could exceed our phone and Internet bills!

And don’t even get me started on toilet paper. Christ.

I think that the worst thing about shopping for your family is the desire to actually feed your loved ones healthyΒ food. And if that’s a priority, be sure to budget an extra $50 per grocery run, because if you want to be healthy, it’s gonna cost you an arm and a leg.

Our closest grocery store is the most expensive one I’ve ever been to, and yet we still buy 80% of our food there. Why? The only thing I can say is that it’s super convenient. AND THAT’S HOW THEY GETCHA. We go for the roast chickens and stay for their organic aisles, but we bitch under our breath at how much our bills are every. damn. time.

Something has to change!

On that note, there is a new grocery store in Ottawa I’m pretty drawn to called called Nu Grocery and I would LOVE to check it out. Its entire concept is built around having zero packaging for all of their products. So all you do is show up with containers, fill ’em, and pay for the food you want. It’s basically a concept that reduces our carbon footprint or whatevs, but I’m super intrigued as to whether or not prices would be lower, too. I would love to fill my mason jar full of butter and pay a fraction of the cost!

But that trek is for another day, one filled with extra time, extra money, and extra tupperware. All of which are the things I cannot spare.

 

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Hot, Bothered, & Barely Sleeping

Lately I’ve been going through something at home that’s forced me to sleep in the living room a number of times. While the title of this post may lead to thoughts of, “Oh, is there trouble in paradise?” that couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, this has nothing to do with my better half, and it even surprisingly doesn’t have anything to do with the twins! It’s about something that has been brewing inside of me for awhile that only comes out at night.

Hot flashes.

Don’t ask me why it’s been happening, ’cause I don’t have an answer. Throughout the day I’m the chilly one, covering up and asking people to turn the temperature up on the A/C. There are even times that I will go to bed and will be freezing after ten minutes of laying down, requiring me to reach for the socks and a bulky sweater – even in the summer! After a couple of hours I may wake up, remove these items, and go back to sleep. Other nights, I won’t need to cover up at all, but I am still overcome by the heat wave that strikes each night between 2 and 5 am.

But this isn’t just like waking up and having to shed a layer, it’s like I’m actually roasting like a basted turkey in my bed. Nothing will provide relief from the sauna that is cranked up high inside my body. I am radiating heat like The Human Torch or the actual sun.Β 

Now I’m not talking about night sweats, where you wake up anxious and drenched. It’s just an intense heat that leaves me tossing and turning on the nights that I decide to stay put on our comfortable mattress, instead of hailing to the couch for some relief.

Lately, I’ve been taking to the living room more often than I’d like – even if the couch is a bitch on the back – because that is where the air conditioner lives. I can literally lay underneath it and bask in the frosty, artificial air and manage to regulate my body temperature and sneak in a couple more hours of sleep.

While Chloe and Sophie are doing much better at sleeping throughout the night, it seems my body just won’t welcome the opportunity to get a full night of rest.

Now I’m not sure why this is happening. Is it a hormonal mom thing? Is it because summer in Ottawa just won’t freakin’ end? Is it the fact that the duvet I’ve used all summer suddenly traps my body heat and reflects it back to me, creating an actual “baking” effect? I’m not sure, which is why I wanted to share this awful menopause-esque hell I’ve been going through, and possibly get some insights from other moms.

So moms: did (or do) you also bake like a DiGiorno pizza at night?

Going Organic: Episode 2 – Natural Dish Soaps

There will come a time in every parent’s life when they will finally (and thankfully!) stop sterilizing bottles and can welcome the simplicity of hand-washing those many, many bottle pieces. Now that you’re conscious of every germ and chemical that comes in contact with your baby, you’re probably in need to finding a dish soap that will get the dirty job done, while also reducing any potential harm it may cause for your growing, and immune system lacking, human.

While there are some things we can pass on when it comes to organic products (toilet paper is one of them), we believe that dish soap is something worth spending a few more pennies on to ensure that any soap remnants remaining on our mugs or spoons are not slowly poisoning our bodies, or the little bodies of Chloe and Sophie.

We’ve had the advantage of testing mostly every eco-friendly dish soap that we can get at the grocery store or pharmacy and we’ve had opinions on them all. We definitely have a favourite, but I’ll quickly go over the good, the bad, and the ugly brands you’re likely to find at any supermarket.

The Good

Seventh Generation or Green Works are both fairly inexpensive and efficient soaps that you can find at most Loblaws, Real Canadian Superstores, or Shoppers Drug Marts. So far, I haven’t been able to locate any eco dish soaps whatsoever at my local Walmart, but that’s not to say they’re not offered at other locations. Both are usually under $5 and are often on sale. The scents are really nice (we love the Green Works Water Lily scent) and both offer up a fairly decent cleaning job. The only problem with the Green Works is that it’s made with Clorox, which isn’t exactly “chemical free” if you ask me. Because it works alongside the power of bleach, it can be pretty hard on the hands. And when you’re constantly washing dishes, the last thing you need is a pair of hands that are dissolving before your very eyes.

The Bad

Eco Max and Bio-Vert are both pretty useless when it comes to cleaning if you ask me. While both are on the cheaper end of environmentally-friendly products, costing a bit more than your average Palmolive, their price doesn’t necessary make up for their poor job at cleansing the dishes. They both lure you in with fresh scents and a reasonable price tag, but you should only be grabbing for one of these if the other decent soaps are sold out or you’re on a super tight budget.

The Ugly

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If you want to spend a few bucks on something that’s going to be squirted right down the drain, but makes you feel like you’re being eco-conscious, Nature Clean is a great option for that. This is pure garbage that makes me want to use any other chemical-infused solution over this bottle of useless liquid. It deceives you with fresh and soothing scents like lavender and tea tree, but don’t be fooled. The price is cheap, but it’s on par with other non-organic brands, so the only difference you’ll notice is the fact that it doesn’t smell like anything, lacks the ability to produce any sort of lather, and you’ll have to squirt a third of it into the sink before it creates any sort of foam. Before you’ve even finished washing the first round of bottle pieces, you’re looking into a foamless, murky void that makes you wish you had some Dawn on hand.

The Favourite

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If you want the soap that cleanses well, smells amahhhhzing, and is totally worth its (typically) $4.49 price tag, Method is calling your name. Sure it’s trendy and the most expensive of the “inexpensive” eco dish soap brands, but the extra buck or two will be worth it for one reason alone – it has a hands-free pump, meaning that it doubles as a hand soap. That’s right. When you get your baby’s feces all over your hands following a massive blowout, this dish soap lets you lather up with having to handle any products in the process. This handy feature – and gentle feel between your digits – will be the cherry on top of an already great product!

So when you’re ready to stop boiling or microwaving those bottle pieces, remember what’s truly awful and save yourself the experiment, and choose something your hands and life will thank you for (*cough, Method).

 


*I feel that it’s important to note that all of the products featured in the Going Organic series are NOT paid endorsements or advertisements. I’m simply spreading the news to other parents about organic products that we have tried, loved, or wished we’d never spent our money on.Β 

Going Organic: Episode 1 – Live Clean Baby

Before having kids, my partner and I were big fans of the Live Clean brand. We bought the shampoo and conditioner in bulk, used their Fresh Face line of facial wipes, and replaced my Bath & Body Works hand soaps with the coconut milk moisturizing ones by Live Clean, saving ourselves at least $2.00 a pop and cleansing our palms with something we could feel good about. When compared to similar products, we’ve discovered that Live Clean is better for you, your wallet, and the environment.

Before our babies even arrived, we were stocking up on the Live Clean Baby products and requesting them on our registry, from the gentle and calming varieties of the tearless baby wash to the oatmeal relief diaper ointment.

Each item under the Live Clean Baby brand is under $10 and is worth every penny. The products tend to go pretty far (and we have twins, so remember it’s twice the distribution), although depending on how big of a bath you run for your baby (sink vs. tub), we find that the shampoo and wash doesn’t last long. It’s the only Live Clean Baby product we’ve had to replace on a fairly regular basis, but it’s one we’re happy to add to our cart alongside their teething biscuits.

Aside from the fact that this brand is eco-friendly, vegan, 97% plant based, hypoallergenic, and free of phosphates, dyes, and parabens (all key terms for a millennial mommy!), it doesn’t dry out the girls’ skin and leaves them smelling fresh for days. Best of all, it’s completely within our budget. Compared to the Aveeno Baby wash and shampoo, it’s slightly less in price. However, it’s a tad more than the Johnson & Johnson soaps and products when comparing volumes.

The Johnson & Johnson washes and products are the better deal financially, but it may not be the best to use on your little one. Recent studies have found that the line of baby products are made with toxic chemicals and other controversial ingredients. The worst culprit being baby powder (a substance that, coincidentally, Live Clean Baby does not produce).

If you’re searching for a line of baby products that range from lotions, petroleum jelly’s, and even massage oils that you won’t think twice about using on your newborn, the Live Clean Baby line is a safe and secure bet. The best deals we’ve found in price have been at Walmart, but they frequently go on sale at many other grocery stores and pharmacies.

If you have a cost-efficient product you’d like to have reviewed, send me a message (or a sample!).Β 


Going Organic is a series that discusses the trend that most modern mothers love to incorporate into their millennial parenting strategy. This strategy involves feeding their children foods that are ideally organic, free of added sugars (including glucose, fructose, and corn syrup), artificial colours or flavours, preservatives, and other ingredients that are considered “bad”. This strategy also applies to any product that is used topically, since anything absorbed into the skin is also risky. As a millennial mommy, I’m not immune to this trend and often find myself directing my shopping carts towards the organic aisles.

Unfortunately for our family, we’re not financially cut out for living the #organiclife, which is why we’ve become increasingly savvy when it comes to choosing the right products for our budget, and ones we can feel good about feeding and applying to our kids.

The food and products that will be reviewed throughout this series are all under $10 and can be found at any grocery store or pharmacy.


 

From Marketing to Motherhood

Being a mom is a great part of my life. It’s new, fun, adventurous, but this beautiful job is not a career and it’s certainly not fulfilling my desire to succeed, nor does it make me feel accomplished.

To bring these thoughts out in the open may seem harsh or insensitive to sahm’s or women who dream of conceiving, but to me it’s something I feel like I have to keep my mouth shut about and fake the fullness that children are supposed to bring to my life.

When you become a mom, the world starts to believe that this was your sole purpose. Consider ‘Mom’ to be your only title from here on out. Everything else in your life – career, friends, alone time – is just part of a support system to aide in your primary mission of being the best mom you can be. You may go to work or do something for yourself, but society wants us to feel guilty about it.

I love my daughters, but there is a big part of me that misses my old working life. And no amount of nursery rhymes, baby milestones, or cooking meals for my children will ever replace that.

In the last few months, I have been earning a living through freelance writing. It keeps the food on their high chairs and the shoes on their feet, but it’s not enough. For me, anyways.

Since early spring, I’ve been taking my time to apply to places that are looking for my professional background, experience, and education. I have no problem making it through to the interview phase, and yet the opportunities continue to go nowhere.

I am not ashamed of being a mom and so it will inevitably come up when I start discussing my life and current work. I don’t let the fact that I have children affect what I do. I have help and time and the ability to continue on with my career. Although, I can’t help but think that being a mother is a factor when potential employers are sifting through would-be hires.

Before I had babies, finding work was never an issue. I’m driven, experienced, and can give a good interview. But now it is a struggle.

The only thing that’s changed is the fact that I’m a mother.

Even the opportunities I do get are directed at women who are home with the kids; writing for baby websites and baby products.

I’ll say it again. I’m not ashamed of my children, but it makes me wonder if it’s even worth mentioning during the interview process.

I am capable of much more than being a mom. I pursued a life in marketing and paid good money for that dream to become a reality. The student debt still hangs over me and will be there for a long time. I owe it to my education and life to succeed in the field I am good at.

But it’s not about the money. Our bills are paid and we live comfortably.

It’s about the career. It’s about the passion and the work and the sense of accomplishment. It’s about the company culture and deadlines and clients. It’s about the stress and job well done. It’s about so much more than a salary.

It’s about being fulfilled as a person, and not as a mom.

Employers. Please don’t pigeonhole me for being fertile.

In fact, don’t discriminate against any hardworking, career-oriented mothers. Women are great at multitasking and we’re more than capable of juggling a career and children. Give us a shot. I’m sure we’ll all surprise you.

On a lighter note, this has opened up a new opportunity for me, one that is directed at giving up on finding employment and taking the reigns to create it. That’s right.

I am (slowly) looking to start my own business in providing content marketing services.

It may sound exciting and admirable, but the truth is that I’m terrified to take that step. To sacrifice security and comfort and to attempt something that could fail is something I have to constantly convince myself of being the right decision.

It’s a thought that I have abandoned and resurrected about a hundred times.

All that to say, sometimes us hardworking moms just need to create our own opportunities, and many already have.

To those who don’t let motherhood define them, you’re a rock star. Email me and let me know how you managed to take that next step for you and your family.

You Suck! Now That You’re A Mom

Being a good mom means putting aside your wants and needs for the sake of adequately protecting and raising your children. It means redirecting your focus from selfish insecurities and indulgences to no longer giving af about much else other than your babies, maintaining some version of a presentable household, and ensuring that your adultish responsibilities are met (ie: paying bills and getting your oil changed).

Being a good mom also means that you will slowly start to lose your cool, and I mean that in the rad, hip and happening sort of way (although you will inevitably lose your cool in the other sense of the word, too). The things that used to make you stand out and shape your personality and relationships have become a distant, fond recollection that you desperately try to cling to as you scroll through your Facebook memories and vye to resurrect that cool and with it side to you once again… but maybe next year, when you’re less busy.

I’m here to tell you that as a mom, you suck. Or, certain things you do suck. And it all starts to go downhill the moment you go into labour, greet your newborn, and face the fear of not knowing wtf to do with the thing the moment you get home. Suckage literally begins with your baby’s first latch and continues into every facet of your life.

While you start to decline in a number of areas of your life, this siphoning vacuum is balanced by the things you start to become good at since embracing motherhood, such as self-doubt, worrying, and Googling. Yay!

While every mom begins to suck in different degrees and circumstances, there are 7 things that most moms can agree on when asked what has gone from successful to epic fail since becoming a mom.

Cooking

You’d think with all these baby food tools and containers that prepping a meal would be made easier for moms, but it simply ain’t. IT. AIN’T. When it comes to making any sort of meal, whether it’ll be consumed by your tot or not, it’s gonna get burned, or be mushy, raw, or tasteless. Whatever the cooking faux pas, it’s going to happen because you just don’t have the time or the attention span to give two shits about whether it’s Master Chef worthy, just so long as it’s edible. Before babies, you had the hours, the budget, and the dedication to preparing a five-course meal for your friends. As a parent, you’re ordering take-out.

Socializing

Whatever the occasion pre-spawn, you were there. Sporting event at the pub? GAME. ON. Networking opportunity? SIGN ME UP. Girls night? In. Beach volleyball game? Eh…alright, whatevs. Now it’s like, “How’s two weeks from now, in the afternoon because my baby has an appointment, but we can squeeze in some time after their lunch and before their nap. Does that work?” Your friends really have to be accommodating and patient if looking to get in any sort of face time with you. As for invites to parties and other social events? That’ll take some MacGyver-like planning and rearranging on your end to make an appearance.

Fashion

Life before becoming a Mom meant disposable income that would be spent on furnishing your pre-baby body with labeled linens and branded swag. It meant taking a trip to the closest mall whenever you had a free day (which was often) and picking up a few things to accentuate your on point wardrobe. If you’re a mom, those days are no longer an option. Aside from the fact that all your money is being inhaled by your offspring, you just don’t have the time or the body to care about what’s in style anymore. Pre-twins I had Kate Spade and RW&CO, now I’ve got loads of Joe Fresh. Why? Because it’s comfy as f**k, it can take a hit of puke without me feeling remorseful,Β and I can pick it up while also buying baby food, eggs, and beer at the grocery store.

Awareness of Current Events

Okay, maybe this one is just me, as I don’t currently have cable or subscribe to any news publications, but I’m calling the odds that most moms don’t keep up with new business ventures, the stock market, politics, or who’s leading when it comes to major sporting competitions. If anything, we’re learning about the news via Facebook or by overhearing it while we’re picking up a convenience store coffee. At best, we’ve grabbed the tabloids at the checkout. So while we may not be able to contribute to a conversation on Trump’s latest actions as president, we can tell you the names of George Clooney’s twins.

Self-Care

This is not as shocking as it may seem. We do care about maintaining ourselves; shower, shave, brush teeth, deodorant, done. We cover the basics and that’s about it. Making time for exercise, doing our makeup or nails, plucking, or even brushing our hair, is solely reserved for special occasions or on days where you miraculously wind up with an extra hour to spare.

Talking On The Phone

I remember the days when I could sit on the phone and have a conversation that would easily exceed an hour. Time wasn’t even something I had to be conscious of monitoring, unless someone’s show was about to start or I was getting sleepy. Nowadays, having a phone call that exceeds five minutes is dreaded. You just don’t have the patience to endure it, especially while trying to detach your twins from each other because they’re slapping each other’s faces. If what you want is a phone call, you best schedule that shit before dialling those digits – or better yet, send a message – because chances are, she’s not gonna pick up.

Pop Culture References

Aside from learning mild details from the aforementioned andΒ rareΒ impulse buy of purchasing a grocery store mag, we can’t tell you squat about what’s happening in the world of music or movies. “Hey, you hear that new song by…” Nope. We’re gonna stop you right there. We have no idea what song or new artist you’re referring to. And while we would love to schedule a time to go see a movie with a friend, we have no idea what’s playing and all of the titles look foreign to us. We’ll check out who’s in it and decide based on that.

While there are some moms who probably rock at maintaining some thread of success in these areas, while also mom-ing her heart out, I’d like to hope that the majority share in the same dwindling areas of past successes as I do.

In the meantime, we moms take pride in knowing that while that phase of our lives is over, this new phase is something we embrace and cherish even more than being good at all those things. So while we might not be around much or rockin’ the latest trends, we are mastering a new challenge and it’s one that we most certainly don’t suck at: motherhood.

I’m A Bad Mom

If you’re a mom, your ultimate fear is that you are somehow unfit to parent. You’re scared that your mom skills just won’t cut it and somehow you are not doing the best you can for the children you brought into this world. A lot of the time, this fear is ridiculous and obviously if you’re worrying about not doing enough, you’re already doing plenty more than others. The mere fact that you worry means that you care and are rocking the job more than you know. But when a medical professional says enough about your poor parenting to have your fears confirmed, it’s downright crippling. Two weeks ago I was in agony over the fact that I was professionally considered a bad mom.

For those who don’t know, our girls turned one on June 11. Woohoo! Their first birthday. We could not believe how fast the last year went by and how strong we were to have survived it. With this major milestone came the one year check-up with their pediatrician. To say it did not go well is a drastic understatement.

Upon arrival, our girls were measured and weighed as usual by the nurse. She gathered the stats and let us know that the girls lost weight since their last exam three months ago. Okay. We were a little shocked since they visibly grew and were now fitting into larger clothing, but we figured it would be up for discussion as to why once we saw the doctor. The nurse passed off their information to the doc and told us to wait.

No sooner did the girls’ doctor walk through that door did she start to verbally attack us. She said that she was not happy to see those numbers and gave us shit over their decreased weights. We were also unhappy to hear about the weight loss, but we had no idea it was as awful as she was claiming it to be.

Almost immediately I entered defence mode with her harsh questioning and remarks, being equally aggressive in my answers. She was making me legit pissed. Then she dropped a bomb on us that I’m not sure we’ll ever recover from. She threatened to call CAS. We could not even believe the words she uttered.

I backed down instantly and listened to her condescending and heartbreaking words. Their weight loss could lead to developmental issues. Their brains can stop growing. We couldn’t even believe we had put our girls in such jeopardy. She made us feel like the worst parents in the world and we believed that we were.

I broke down crying as she asked us questions about their diet. We let her know what and how much we fed them. Our meal and snack choices were great and she was surprised by this information. SURPRISED. She didn’t even care that we were feeding them so much. And trust me, we do. They gobble up so much food you’d THINK they were starving. They eat more than other babies, hands down. For whatever reason, the period between their nine month and one year visit they had dropped a little weight.

Well, we have a reason. And to this, we’re guilty. In an effort to wean our girls off of formula and replace the calories with food, we had diluted their formula with water so that they would eat more food and require less formula. This was working. This was done without our doctor’s consent, as we a) believed it was a smart choice, and b) did not know we had to consult the doctor in such matters (being first time parents and all). We had intended to work towards replacing it with fatty milk and was going to discuss this with the doctor at this appointment. When she learned about what we had done, she went off. She criticized us in a way that made us feel stupid and incompetent to parent and diluting formula was the most sinful thing we could have done for our children. This, it turns out, was why they were not gaining weight.

Let me take this moment to add more to the story. The reason we had diluted the milk in the first place (aside from weaning) was because the girls had been frequently vomiting in the night when we started feeding them more meal portions, snacks, as well as bottles of formula for their naps and bedtime. This reaction, we assumed, was because they were just eating way too much and that their stomachs couldn’t handle the extra calories. They suffered from reflux in the past and we knew that their stomachs were a little iffy at times. It was only then that we made the decision that it was time to wean.

When the doctor left the room, the both of us had broken down in horrendous sobs, fearful for our girls and feeling like the worst parents in the world. The nurse came in to comfort us and later admitted that the doctor told her that she was too harsh on us. I guess so.

This day was the worst we’ve ever experienced. I’d take late night vomits and explosive shits any day to not have to live through that torture again.

After recovering from our breakdowns and regaining some composure, our emotions quickly turned from defeated and grief-stricken to anger.

HOW DARE SHE TREAT US THIS WAY. We have the best of intentions for our girls and do everything we can to keep them healthy and happy. We worry about them constantly, protecting them and ensuring they always are in a safe environment. We always put their needs first and I can honestly say that we are doing the absolute best we can in making decisions that we believe is right for our daughters. We would never intentionally endanger their health, let alone intentionally underfeed them. And again I must say, we DO NOT underfeed them. There could have been so many reasons for the weight loss and it may not even be strictly because of the diluted formula.

Since their nine month visit, they’ve become WAY more active, crawling and even walking, and therefore burning more calories.Β They’ve also experienced their first virus (which can halt the growth of babies) and have been teething like crazy, causing them to refuse food at times. Not only that, but it’s common for babies to not gain weight, or even lose weight, between these two visits. All of this is new information to us, as we’ve consulted with other medical professionals and family members on the subject. All of this research just further fuels the fire within us over the doctor’s lack of understanding, empathy, or desire to come to any other conclusion other than that we were behaving like neglectful parents.

Aside from all the potential reasons for the slight drop in weight, they are both visibly healthy and happy girls. Their bones are not protruding from their skin. They do not look in any way malnourished, and they’re developing just fine. They are smart and curious and perfect.

As parents, we may not be perfect all the time, but we’re certainly not bad. And we’ve quickly learned that no one, not even a doctor, has the right to make us feel the way we did or have us question ourselves as parents.

We have began feeding the girls milk and fattier foods, as the doctor ordered. However, we will not be going back to that insensitive, offensive person ever again.

We are not at fault and we are not stupid. We live with our daughters and see how they behave and function every day. We know what’s best for them, usually. And when we don’t, well, that’s when we get the help from the doctor or someone else who knows more about babies than we do.

It’s true that it takes a village to raise a child, but that is only true if everyone is supportive and understanding of one another. While we needed to hear that they required more fat, we did notΒ need to be threatened with CAS, been talked down to, or made to believe that we were putting our girls at risk.

This really sucks to share because it hurts me so much to admit that we had made even one mistake when it came to our girls. But I’ve accepted (even with my perfectionist tendencies) that people, including parents, make mistakes and it’s not anyone’s right to criticize you for making them, especially when your intentions are true and involve matters of your heart.